Monthly Archives: May 2011

Angus Phillips new editor of Logos

Logos, one of the premier publishing journals and now 21 years old, is a forum for opinion and the latest research from the international world of publishing. Published by the Dutch publisher Brill, it provides a platform for communication between publishing professionals, librarians, authors, scholars, and those in allied professions. From this Spring the new editor is Angus Phillips. The journal has also been relaunched with a new design using the Brill typeface.

The journal is international in scope and includes contributions on authorship, readership, book publishing, librarianship and bookselling. Articles about the related fields of journals and magazines are also welcome, as are contributions around digital developments such as blogging and multimedia. Submissions are invited from both professionals and academics, and research articles will be subject to peer review. Publishers are invited to send books for review. To make contact please email the Editor-in-Chief: angus.phillips@brookes.ac.uk

‘I want to be a writer’

Much has been made of the word disintermediation over the last couple of years in book publishing. Authors are selling direct to their readers, publishers are selling direct to consumers, for example, in an attempt to miss out the middlemen. The picture becomes ever more confusing with agents setting up as publishers and now in the last few days the news that Amazon are setting up their own publishing operation in New York, headed up by the former literary agent Laurence Kirshbaum. Meanwhile Random House have done a deal direct with the author Tom Sharpe to sell ebooks of his titles – on this occasion bypassing Sharpe’s agency Sheil Land Associates.

By contrast the self-published author, Amanda Hocking, who has sold hundreds of thousands of ebooks to Kindle users, has decided to sign up with a traditional publisher for her next four books. The deal, worth $2m for world English rights, sees Hocking signed up to Macmillan. The New York Times describes the books as being in the ‘young-adult paranormal genre’. Writing on her blog, she says that: ‘I’m a writer. I want to be a writer. I do not want to spend 40 hours a week handling emails, formatting covers, finding editors, etc. Right now, being me is a full time corporation.’


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Mad Men

As an example of unexpected product placement, a book featured in the TV series Mad Men, as read by Donald Draper, has been brought back into print.

When The Best of Everything was first published in 1958, Rona Jaffe’s debut novel electrified readers who saw themselves reflected in its story of five young employees of a New York publishing company. A reviewer on Amazon comments on the exciting world of publishing it describes:

‘The heroine is Caroline Bender, a graduate of Radcliffe College. She does not follow her mother’s matrimonial advice advice (“Don’t let boys touch you”), nor her career advice (“Join the Radcliffe Club”). Instead, she gets a job in the trendy world of publishing along with her three colleagues, where they hazard a world of roving eyes, search for a mate and the good life (rather graphically described for 1958), follow career aspirations, and navigate office politics.’